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Safety in numbers

April 26, 2012

I was surprised how high the collard greens are already – some almost a foot.   Those are the plants from last year, wintered over and protected with the glass windows.   Okra in the long field greenhouse has small leaves and is up several inches.   More ground tilled and ready for planting.  The scapes in the garlic plots are 6 to 8 inches high

 Our grandchildren, ages 5 and 7, visited with me today.   The goats were a big hit.  We fed the adults small carrot pieces, and watched the kids play, well, like ‘kids’.  They jumped up and down on the logs and tin roof sheets as if they were climbing mountains.  Kicking their heels up into the air, they butted the chickens brave enough to enter their domain.  They all gently licked the children’s’ fingers and hands, enjoying the minerals and salty fingers.   Similar to my grandchildren, it is the female kid who has the feisty personality.

Craig told us that he sees lots of footprints from night visitors such as coyote, deer and fox.  So far, the coyote have not bothered the farm animals.  I asked about the pine cones I had seen in the rows of prepared field from my last visit.  They are for the strawberry plants – a new technique to me.

 Alert!  A crow in a nearby tree gave loud calls of alarm while we watched the goats.  All of a sudden, the chickens and sheep started running for the safety of the barn as fast as they could. Craig explained that they are herd animals, and when one starts, the others follow.   This must be an ancient defense mechanism that brings to mind the expression, “Safety in numbers.”

                

April 26, 2012

I was surprised how high the collard greens are already – some almost a foot.   Those are the plants from last year, wintered over and protected with the glass windows.   Okra in the long field greenhouse has small leaves and is up several inches.   More ground tilled and ready for planting.  The scapes in the garlic plots are 6 to 8 inches higOur grandchildren, ages 5 and 7, visited with me today.   The goats were a big hit.  We fed the adults small carrot pieces, and watched the kids play, well, like ‘kids’.  They jumped up and down on the logs and tin roof sheets as if they were climbing mountains.  Kicking their heels up into the air, they butted the chickens brave enough to enter their domain.  They all gently licked the children’s’ fingers and hands, enjoying the minerals and salty fingers.   Similar to my grandchildren, it is the female kid who has the feisty personality      Craig told us that he sees lots of footprints from night visitors such as coyote, deer and fox.  So far, the coyote have not bothered the farm animals.  I asked about the pine cones I had seen in the rows of prepared field from my last visit.  They are for the strawberry plants – a new technique to me.     Alert!  A crow in a nearby tree gave loud calls of alarm while we watched the goats.  All of a sudden, the chickens and sheep started running for the safety of the barn as fast as they could. Craig explained that they are herd animals, and when one starts, the others follow.   This must be an ancient defense mechanism that brings to mind the expression, “Safety in numbers.”

               

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2 Responses to Safety in numbers

Richard Bamforth
via christinejhigginsfineart.com4 months ago

Christine, Are you the same Christine Higgins I used to sub for at Cony HS? I came across your links on Veterans for Peace messages. I'm glad to learn you are still active and creative. I am still alive but slowing down at 84 years. I have fond memories of my contacts with you and your students at Cony. You were the first person I subbed for and I vividly remember the lesson on Carravagio. Perhaps our paths will cross again before long. Keep up the creativity.

Dick Bamforth

Christine Higgins
via christinejhigginsfineart.com4 months ago

Hello Dick!
Yes, one and the same.
I recently spent 2 weeks making paper in a workshop session at haystack. Two wonderful young men from Combat paper were in our group. I told them I would help promote their upcoming activities in Deer Isle.
I have retired from Cony for 3 years now and make art, see grand-kids, and I participate in some peaceful political activities through Union of Maine Visual Artists. We make banners for non-profits.
send me your email and I'll keep in touch.


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